Wil Murray

Studio view. (at Wil Murray’s Studio)

Studio view. (at Wil Murray’s Studio)

Stu-stu-studio. (at Wil Murray’s Studio)

Stu-stu-studio. (at Wil Murray’s Studio)

Final steps on the edition version of Die Welt In Farben. Happy to be nearly done.

Final steps on the edition version of Die Welt In Farben. Happy to be nearly done.

Vernacular studio build 2

Vernacular studio build 2

Vernacular studio build 1

Vernacular studio build 1

Studio build starting finishing.

Studio build starting finishing.

230 mounted, 262 to be mounted. Bookmaker. All on the Proudfoot family table.

230 mounted, 262 to be mounted. Bookmaker. All on the Proudfoot family table.

Baby steps toward baby steps onto the shape of things to come. Good to be back in the studio.

Baby steps toward baby steps onto the shape of things to come. Good to be back in the studio.

I'm in a show at The Drake Devonshire out in Prince Edward County, Ontario. Looks alright.

Drake Devonshire’s inaugural exhibition focuses on Canadian and international artists who are making direct connections to the past, referencing historic techniques, images and materials in works that are undeniably contemporary.

This parlour setting inspired us to look at books from a conceptual angle. Over the fireplace, Britain’sAbigail Reynolds takes a sculptural approach with two photo collages of book pages featuring ornate palace and museum architecture. Collaged together in a honeycomb pattern they expand the picture plane. While Wil Murray paints dramatic swirling abstract forms around a photo from a vintage German travel book.

Laurent Craste’s seemingly delicate ceramics, reminiscent of Victorian and Edwardian vases and urns take a dramatic turn by embracing an implied violence. Rather than shatter with the force of the hammer, it is absorbed into the vase creating a hybrid form. On either side of Craste’s piece are vintage works byAganetha Dyck. Best known for her sculptures involving honeycombs, these works from the 1970’s are diminutive beaded white sweaters; shrunk in the dryer they are at once minimal figurative sculptures and a domestic mishap.

A recent residency in Florence, Italy opened Rebecca Ladds’ eyes to traditional printmaking techniques, particularly intaglio plates. Here she presents a plate as an artwork in itself, full of the potential to produce hundreds of images, yet it remains a flawless virgin plate. David R Harper also references historic imagery by printing a renaissance painting on canvas and deftly embroidering over the central figure in a play of craft and minimalism.

Planning a diminutive exhibition in a traditional Edwardian parlour was a delightful challenge. I truly hope you enjoy this little show of contemporary works and let it inspire you to think more about how the past informs the present as you wander the new Drake Devonshire.

A lot of satisfaction for very little dough in getting a stamp made.

A lot of satisfaction for very little dough in getting a stamp made.

240 cut, 252 to go. Nearly halfway. (at Glenbow Museum)

240 cut, 252 to go. Nearly halfway. (at Glenbow Museum)

Look what arrived in the mail, just in time for my missing faces and funkhauses contained within.

Look what arrived in the mail, just in time for my missing faces and funkhauses contained within.

Every few years this record sounds great for a day or two.

Every few years this record sounds great for a day or two.